545 McKoy St.

545 McKoy St. Credit: 2009 Citywide Historic Resources Survey.

545 McKoy St. Credit: 2009 Citywide Historic Resources Survey.

545 McKoy St. Demolished April-May 2014.

545 McKoy St. Demolished April-May 2014.

545 McKoy St., Sept. 2014.

545 McKoy St., Sept. 2014.

545 McKoy St., Sept. 2014.

545 McKoy St., Sept. 2014.

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One response to “545 McKoy St.

  1. It’s interesting to visit the block where this property is located because it abuts the Atlanta border. As soon as you hit the Decatur line, you encounter a mass of teardowns replaced by McMansions and extreme renovations.

    What is it about Decatur living that necessitates more square footage; the newer the better? To hear the leadership tell it, you’d think Decatur was all about being environmentally correct, yet building and heating/cooling a large house, no matter how energy efficient, often runs counter to that stated goal.

    From my reading, the greenest house is the one you don’t have to build. Regardless, the wave of teardowns just won’t stop in reputedly green, progressive, eco-friendly Decatur. Gas guzzling trucks rumble down streets toting the debris of demolished vintage homes to our landfills. Others deliver new lumber, cement and bricks for their big, shiny replacements. The construction traffic, noise and construction debris and dust alone make Oakhurst more like a developing subdivision than a peaceful established neighborhood.

    The Oakhurst that was is no more. Certainly, some of the change has been good, but it has come with a cost. Exorbitant taxes, cultural clashes that leave many long time residents feeling like so much garbage compared to their vastly more affluent new neighbors, and jarring streetscapes with 4,000 square foot, modernistic new houses overwhelming existing homes are part of the price tag.

    Is it what people want? Personally, I think many people are as saddened by the massive changes as I am. But we were too busy, too clueless or too lazy to protest, and now, it’s too late to stop the train. Perhaps one bright spot is this: we’re drawing closer to the day when there will be no more homes to demolish. Oh, joy.

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