249 East Lake Dr.

249 East Lake Dr. Credit: 2009 Citywide Historic Resources Survey

249 East Lake Dr. Credit: 2009 Citywide Historic Resources Survey

249 East Lake Dr. Feb. 2014.

249 East Lake Dr. Feb. 2014.

249 East Lake Dr. Feb. 2014.

249 East Lake Dr. Feb. 2014.

249 East Lake Drive. Demolished May 23, 2014. One neighbor emailed, "It's 12:48 on Friday, May 23. When I left at 11 a.m. there was nothing happening. The front of the house is now basically gone."

249 East Lake Drive. Demolished May 23, 2014. One Oakhurst resident emailed, “It’s 12:48 on Friday, May 23. When I left at 11 a.m. there was nothing happening. The front of the house is now basically gone.”

Bought in Jan. 2014 by a local builder, the existing 1,704 square-foot home built in 1915 will be transformed into a 4,700 square-foot manse selling for $950,000. An Oakhurst resident who emailed me about the impending teardown wrote, “It looks to be a future cute bungalow of six bedrooms and five baths. /sarcasm.” The resident added, “Our backyard neighbor called it ‘crazy’ yesterday. I offered condolences on the loss of their south exposure.”

249 East Lake Dr. Credit: Zillow.com (screen capture Apr. 21, 2014).

249 East Lake Dr. Credit: Zillow.com (screen capture Apr. 21, 2014).

Advertisements

5 responses to “249 East Lake Dr.

  1. Your local officials at work creating the “New” Decatur.

    • Hmm, yes. I wonder-are City officials “merely” allowing developers to create our new town it or are they actively working to promote overscale infill. Oh well; not sure it matters what they’re doing. It’s certain they’re not hindering it. Someone please correct me if I’m wrong about that.

  2. David, this property is in or near the area that was within the original town of Oakhurst back in the early 1900’s, isnt it? What a pity…just one more year and she would have turned 100!

    • Ann, This isn’t infill. It’s a teardown and mansionization. Infill construction occurs on green- and brownfields sites where there are no existing buildings. Calling it infill, as the city and its many residents do, simply sanitizes the gentrification processes underway there. As for official support, it’s clear from the City’s policies — elected and appointed officials — that this is the direction Decatur is intended to take. Whether it’s failing to enact a moratorium on demolitions to failing to agree on a legal definition of “teardown,” the City Commission historically has sided with business and development dollars over the concerns of citizens. And, since there’s a historically demonstrated lack of community organization and mobilization against gentrification, one could argue that the City’s actions simply reflect taxpayer wishes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s