Monthly Archives: June 2012

1110 Adams Street

1110 Adams Street being prepped for teardown. June 19, 2012.

1110 Adams Street. Teardown, July 5, 2012.

1110 Adams Street. Teardown, July 5, 2012.

1110 Adams Street. Builder’s brochure.

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169 Olympic Place

Brick multi-family apartment building demolished; lot subdivided; two McMansions built (2011-2012).

169 Olympic Place. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

171 and 173 Olympic Place. Constructed in 2011-2012 to replace the brick apartment building that once occupied 169 Olympic Place. June, 2012.

108 Fifth Avenue

Spotted by Terry Kearns in February, 2012.

 

 

108-fifth-redone.jpg

Finished 2015

220 Fourth Avenue

220 Fourth Avenue. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

220 Fourth Avenue. Tree cutting in advance of demolition for mansionization. June 15, 2012.

220 Fourth Avenue. July 31, 2012.

220 Fourth Avenue. August 5, 2012.

220 Fourth Avenue. August 9, 2012.

220 Fourth Avenue, as seen from the neighbor to the south. August 9, 2012.

220 Fourth Avenue, as seen from the neighbor to the north. August 9, 2012.

1026 Adams Street

1026 Adams Street. June 12, 2012.

Builder’s Website placeholder for 1026 Adams Street. Credit: http://segway-properties.com/properties_for_sale.html

This property was one of the Decatur urban homesteading dollar homes. In November 2012, the home was torn down, along with its neighbor at 1020 Adams Street. Prior to its acquisition by the builder in the summer of 2012, the home had been owned by the same family who bought it in 1978 for $1.00. To date, this builder has torn down several of the former homesteading homes and replaced them with homes 2 and three times the size of the teardowns. The copy from a real estate Website hints that the lot is ideal for another McMansion:

Design your own modern classic home with Decatur’s premier builder, Arlene Dean. This is an opportunity to work directly with Arlene and her team of professionals, including award winning architect, Eric Rawlings, AIA, LEED, to custom build a home from the ground up on this oversized corner lot. You will be able to walk to McKoy Park without crossing any streets and easily stroll to Oakhurst Village and 5th Ave. School. Known for her classic designs, skillful use of materials and advanced building techniques, Arlene Dean will build the home you’ve been dreaming of.

1026 Adams Street after teardown. November 7, 2012.

1026 Adams Street. Completed replacement home.

1026 Adams Street. Completed replacement home.

154 Greenwood Avenue

154 Greenwood Avenue. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

154 Greenwood Avenue. June 2012.

150 Greenwood Avenue

150 Greenwood Avenue. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

150 Greenwood Avenue. June 2012.

217 Fourth Avenue

217 Fourth Avenue. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

217 Fourth Avenue. April 30, 2012.

217 Fourth Avenue. A teardown yet legally just a rehab. Maybe the builder’s going to leave the rear & roof off the final product to make it more airy. Or not.  June 7, 2012.

217 Fourth Avenue. June 12, 2012.

217 Fourth Avenue. June 30, 2012.

217 Fourth Avenue. Side facade extent as seen (between trees) from Gordon Avenue to the South. June 30, 2012.

425 Fayetteville Road

425 Fayetteville Road. Apartments demolished in 2011. Credit: 2009 City of Decatur Historic Resources Survey.

427 and 431 Fayetteville Road. New homes constructed in 2011-2012 at former apartments site. April, 2012.

The Decatur sustainability video

Exclusionary zoning + teardowns + mansionization  sustainability

115 North McDonough Street

On June 1, 2012 the Georgia state historic preservation office announced that the Downtown Decatur Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. No one told the owners of 115 North McDonough Street that their contributing property would no longer contribute to the historic district after this project is completed. And then there’s the impact to the new historic district’s integrity. The incompatible front addition breaks the historical setback line found in the remaining contributing properties and it diminishes the district’s feeling and setting.

115 North McDonough Street. Credit: 2009 Decatur Historic Resources survey.

115 N. McDonough Street. June 2, 2012.

115 North McDonough Street. June 15, 2012.

115 North McDonough Street. June 15, 2012.

115 North McDonough. June 19, 2012. Via Instagram.

115 N. McDonough under construction. August 2, 2012.

115 N. McDonough under construction as seen from the intersection of N. McDonough and Trinity. August 2, 2012.

115 N. McDonough Street. September 8, 2012.

Rendering of completed project at 115 N. McDonough Street. Credit: Lightroom, Inc.

Read more about the changes to this building. And by the way, did I mention that the owner and designer is an architect who specializes in historic preservation? Nuts, right?

115 N. McDonough Street, 2009 Decatur Historic Resource Survey inventory form.

In 2015, the Georgia chapter of the American Institute of Architects gave this project an “Honor Award.”

Credit: July/August 2015 Decatur Focus, p. 9

Credit: July/August 2015 Decatur Focus, p. 9